Top 5

Jim Fox

Former NHL forward turned broadcaster Jim Fox has been around the world in pursuit of the best wine. Here are his Top 5 wine destinations:


  1. Wine Tour on bike on the outskirts of Beaune, Burgundy, France

  2. Barrel tasting at Roberto Voerzio Winery, La Morra, Barolo, Piedmonte, Italy

  3. Tasting Class and barrel tasting at Chateau Lynch Bages, Pauillac, Bordeaux, France)

  4. Dinner and tasting at Savier Vineyards, just southeast of Calistoga, California, at sunset looking back over Napa Valley

  5. Anywhere in Tuscany, Italy followed by a glass of wine in the Piazza del Campo, Siena, Tuscany, Italy
NHL Confidential

Brad RichardsonVancouver Canucks forward Brad Richardson, formerly of the Colorado Avalanche, recommends John Elway's restaurant in suburban Denver. "It’s the best prime rib I’ve ever had," Richardson says. "Have it with the creamed corn."

JP

Posts Tagged ‘Throwback Thursday’

Throwback Thursday: Mario Lemieux, the song.

Today’s TT is straight out of the so-bad-it’s-good file.

What it is, exactly, is somewhat elusive. We believe it’s the music video to a song called “Mario Lemieux” by a band called “Better Tennis.” Problem is, you won’t find any tangible proof that the song or the band exists outside of this page, so take it all with a grain of salt.

Whatever it is — whoever spliced the images, recorded the song, and copied Mario Lemieux’s bio from Wikipedia and pasted it on their Vimeo page to accompany this bland piece of electro-pop — it’s all oddly fascinating.

Here’s a synopsis of what you’re about to see:

Read the rest of this entry »

Throwback Thursday: Sittler’s record night.

What were you doing on this day 37 years ago?

If you were the Toronto Maple Leafs’ statistician, you were scrounging through the NHL record books to find out who had the record for the most points in a single game. (The answer prior to Feb. 7, 1976: Maurice Richard, with 8.)

Darryl Sittler scored 10 in the Leafs’ 11-4 win over the Boston Bruins that night, a record that is virtually unassailable. Consider that when Sam Gagner scored eight points in a single game for the Oilers last season, it was the most by any player since the 1980s.

Sittler had six goals and four assists in the game. To put that in perspective, Scott Gomez had 11 points – two goals and nine assists – all of last season. Link Gaetz had six goals in his entire NHL career.

Enjoy the ultimate goalie’s nightmare:

Throwback Thursday: Donnybrook of the decade?

This is barely a throwback, but just roll with it.

On Dec. 28, two Southern Professional Hockey League teams, the Huntsville (Alabama) Havoc and Mississippi Surge participated in one of the worst hockey brawls we’ve seen in years. Decades. Millennia. It was a throwback to a simpler, bloodier time of Broad Street Bullies and Malices at Palaces.

Enjoy:

Throwback Thursday: ‘Penalty box’: The song.

There’s a long, hilarious tradition of hockey enforcers parlaying their popularity to something that transcends the game. Often it’s something cheesy. Think Dan Carcillo’s radio show, Paul Bissonnette’s Twitter feed, or Tiger Williams’ cookbook.

While the cover of “Done Like Dinner” is priceless, legendary Broad Street Bullies tough guy Dave Schultz takes the cake – er, the cheese – with his original recording of “Penalty Box,” an ode to his home away from home. Recorded in 1977, it somehow didn’t reach any of the Billboard charts despite such timeless lyrics as “Love is like an ice hockey game/Sometimes it can be rough/Girl, you’ve got me so all aflame/I never never get enough.”

It did reach YouTube, which is all we care about. Enjoy:

Throwback Thursday: Transform your home into the Maple Leaf Gardens!

Maple Leafs banner

Since the Toronto Maple Leafs haven’t hung a Stanley Cup banner of their own in any of the last five decades, there would be a cruel irony to hanging one in your own living room.

OK, that was a cheap shot.

Not so cheap: One of the six (1948, ’49, ’51, ’63, ’64, ’67) Cup banners that once hung in Maple Leaf Gardens. They’re among the myriad items currently up for bids at Frozen Pond Auctions.

Read the rest of this entry »

Throwback Thursday: The WHA

Minnesota Saints

WHA hockey fight

Phoenix Roadrunners fans

Phoenix Roadrunners program

Ask any teenager to define “wha” and he or she will plainly tell you that it’s slang for “what?”, as in “wha’happened?”, knowing nothing of the short-lived hockey league that I’m about to riff on.

The World Hockey Association was built on the back of Bobby Hull’s star turn in Winnipeg. The league’s wide net brought in Gordie Howe and, briefly, Wayne Gretzky. If this is news to you, stop what you’re doing and set aside the next hour of your life to read the Toronto Sun’s awesome recent series about the WHA. If not, read it anyway. The series is well-researched and offers quite a trip down memory lane.

To this day, the WHA has at least one thing that the NHL doesn’t: Its own Hall of Fame. Go visit its website to see more of the nostalgic photos that you see above, and arrange a donation of that old Calgary Cowboys sweater hanging up in your attic.

Throwback Thursday: Dominik Hasek

Domink Hasek

I can recall several years ago interviewing CBC Analyst and “Battle of the Blades” contestant Brad May. He was in the twilight of his career with the Anaheim Ducks. I was in the dawn of my career as an NHL reporter. May was about to visit Buffalo for the first time in several years — perhaps the first time ever as a visiting player. We talked about those great Sabres teams of the mid-to-late 1990s (Mayday! Mayday! Mayday!) and all the great players he once counted as teammates.

Of course, it didn’t take him long to mention Dominik Hasek.

I figured that I’ve had written this by now, but here it goes: Dominik Hasek has announced his retirement from hockey. The Czech goalie last played in the KHL in the 2010-11 season. Apparently he was looking to come back to the NHL. It would be convenient to say that the lockout cost him that opportunity, but more than likely time had simply run out.

Hasek’s fire was rivaled only by his athleticism. The combination made him one of the best goalies of his era, one of the best of all time, and one of the most likely to still be playing in the NHL at age 47. He was simply remarkable.

Read the story from USA Today, ESPN.com, Toronto Sun, and enjoy this ESPN highlight package:

Throwback Thursday: ‘If I was Gary Bettman, I’d be worried about my family.’

With those famous words, then-32-year-old defenseman Chris Chelios laid down the gauntlet for every crass word directed at the NHL commissioner by an active player. It’s one heck of a gauntlet. We’re still talking about it 18 years later.

That is, unless you forgot or weren’t alive in 1994 — in which case, you’ll be talking about it now …

A few things to remember first:

1. Bettman was one year into his term as commissioner. His knowledge of the game has grown in the years since.

2. Nonetheless, Bettman was still eight years away from confusing Ace Bailey with Ace Bailey.

3. The 1994-95 lockout lasted 104 days. Imagine what a 50-year-old Chelios would say now!

Throwback Thursday: ‘Hockey Sock Rock’

The “Hockey Sock Rock” features then-New York Rangers players Phil Esposito (on lead vocals), Ron Duguay, Dave Maloney and John Davidson. Since this “music video” was shot in 1979 as a fundraiser for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, all four have enjoyed varying degrees of visibility — Esposito as a GM and TV personality in Tampa, Davidson as president of the St. Louis Blues (a position he’s leaving this week), Maloney as the New York Rangers’ color commentator and Duguay as a Rangers TV analyst on the MSG Network.

My favorite comment among those left on YouTube: “if you put it in hd, you can actually hear their dignity being torn in half.”

It just melts the lockout blues away …

Throwback Thursday: Contemplating the potential of an empty hockey rink.

Here at AllPuck.com, we do not ignore the looming lockout. Nor do we pretend to know the difference between the NHL’s old and new definitions of Hockey Related Revenue, or how far apart the owners are from the players, or how far apart the owners of the most profitable teams are from the owners of the least profitable clubs. We merely know that these massive details are lying somewhere beneath the ocean surface, and that all we see are the tips of the icebergs — cold and icy, like this and this.

One thing we do know is the potential of an empty hockey rink and are not afraid to address it. Behold:

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